Easy Guide to Composting

Easy Guide to Composting

Using kitchen scraps and yard waste is a frugal way to make your own composting material.  By doing so, you are also keeping your yard, garden and flowers healthy in a natural way.  To help you get started in making your own composting, here are some easy tips:

 As with most things, it should start with the planning.  Think about how much compost you will need and how much raw material you have access to.  Knowing this, will help in deciding how large your composting bin should be.

Composting

Earth Worms: The hardest worker in the garden

A worm box can be of any size as long as it has a lid, water proof sides and bottom and you have a supply of paper of all kinds, [newspaper, computer paper or magazines] and dirt.  You can purchase a ready-made worm composting system, or you can make your own by poking holes, at the top, for air flow and at the bottom for drainage, in a see through, plastic container then set it on some type of drainage tray.  Once you have your worms, box, paper and dirt, the rest is all up to the worms.  Make a layer of dirt about 4 inches deep, introduce your worms, then wet the paper and tare it into 2-3 inch strips and place it in the box.  Place the lid on the box and let the boys go to work.  Never let your worm bin get below 55 degrees or the process will stop and your worms might die.

For those with larger outdoor areas, compost bins can be built outdoors for little money and effort. You can also compost without a bin and simply make a pile in a sheltered corner of your yard.

An outdoor bin can be built for little or no money using what you have on hand. Wooden pallets that you can find at any retail store make great composting bins. Most large retail store will give you these for just hauling them away.  You will need 4-6 of the pallets to make your bin.  They can be wired or nailed together to make a usable open top composting bin.

Composting

Wooden Pallet Composting Bin

 Except for dairy products, fish and meat, you can put most kitchen scraps into your composting bin, including egg shells, tea leaves, and coffee grounds. Any organic matter from your yard can be added, such as hay, straw, cut grass, leaves, mulch, wood chips, and small pruning from your shrubs. You can also add a layer of shredded newspapers from time to time but without worms, it will take longer to decompose that the household waste.

Chicken droppings can be added to your mixture, chicken manure makes the compost rich and full of nutrients, but do not add waste from other pets, such as dogs or cats.

Turn your compost once a month or so, stirring to aerate it and get the top layer down into the middle.  If your composting bin is in a location where rain water can reach it you should not have a need to water it.  If it is not, water it about once a month with a garden hose or better yet, collect rain water and us it, instead.


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