Archive for small garden spaces

Why I Garden In Raised Beds

Why Garden in Raised Beds?

There’s a growing trend to garden in raised beds. These beds are usually anywhere from eight to twelve inches deep and can be any shape or size you desire. They are easy to build and can fit any size yard or patio. And with a greenhouse built to position on top, you can extend the growing season. Let’s take a look at the benefits of gardening in raised beds.

Gardening in raised beds

1. Soil control – When you build raised beds for home gardening, you have a few choices. You can position it onto the ground or you can build a bottom with holes for drainage. Either way, you’re adding soil to the bed.

You have complete control over the type of soil and can choose the mix that best fits your garden’s needs. Additionally, year after year, you can simply add more quality soil to the box. You don’t have to worry about depleting the existing soil.

2. Easier weeding – Actually, if you use a ground cover like mulch or a weed barrier then you won’t have any weeding to contend with raised beds. Weeding in a traditional garden can take hours each week. With raised beds you simply water and harvest. It’s a lot less work.

3. Works for any size space – Generally, raised beds are four feet by four feet. This is a great size because it fits nicely into a corner and because you can reach across it from any direction. However, if you have a unique sized space that you need to fit a garden into, you can make your raised bed fit your needs. You can, for example, build a long, narrow two by eight foot bed.

4. Easy to build – All you really need are a couple of nails, a hammer, and some wood. You can have the wood measured and precut at the lumber yard or hardware store. Metal brackets can ensure that you have perfect corners too.

5. Longer growing season – The growing season is extended with raised beds because you can start earlier in the season. The soil you add to the bed warms more quickly than the dirt in the ground. Additionally, you can add a greenhouse top to the bed to take your vegetables into the cooler months.

6. No problems with pests – With a raised garden bed you won’t have to worry as much about rabbits and rodents eating your plants. Additionally, you can prevent many bugs from becoming problems.

7. They’re attractive – Using raised beds for gardening can fit any design personality. You can make them out of wood, metal, and even plastic or synthetic wood. You can paint them or adorn them however you like.  Raised beds can becomes part of your outdoor living area.

Raised garden beds fit a variety of needs. They’re lovely, easy to care for, and can extend your growing season by months. Measure your space and start designing your raised bed garden today.

 

Growing What You Eat

www.growingwhatyoueat.com

By growing what you eat, even the smallest garden can give you fresh veggies for salads or ingredients for a complete meal for a long period of time.  The onions, lettuce and young tomato plants you see here, can enrich your meals, for not only the spring and summer seasons but through out the year.

One healthy tomato plant can produce up to 100 tomatoes for you and your family.  The 30+ onions you see here can grow to 4 inches in size.  With a little knowledge on preserving and canning, you can be eating and cooking with onions you planted and grew in you small garden until it’s time to plant them again.  Growing what you eat can be healthier for you and your family plus save you a good amount of money in your food budget.

By harvesting the lettuce in the right way, it too, will be giving you salads or a topping for your best grilled burger, way into summer.  Cut the outer leaves for use instead of pulling up the whole plant and the leaves will grow back in for future picking.  As long as you keep the dirt around them moist and if possible provide a little shade, you will have lettuce until July and the heat over takes them.

Add a package of radish seeds to a small frame of good soil, and they too, will give you many meals in return, with very little effort.

www.growingwhatyoueat.com

 

Radishes are nutritious little balls of fun.  There are many types and flavors when it comes to choosing your favorite kind.  Some have a sharp bite and some are very mild in flavor.  My favorite is the French Breakfast.  It isn’t as round as most and has a sweet mild flavor.  It can be placed in salads, or cooked in a mixture of ways to fit just about any type of meal.  Check out these little healthy bundles the next time you are looking to add something new to your garden.

A small raised bed garden [4 ft by 12 ft] can provide a family of 4 with upward of 200 pounds of produce for the year.  Just think how much that would save you in your food budget.  How do I know this can happen?  Mainly because I have done it for the last two growing periods in NE Tennessee and I am on my way of doing it again, this year.  The secret is, rotating my crops and keeping my little garden full of growing veggies.  Listed here are my main vegetables for each season, in my growing what you eat garden.

Spring Cold Plants:  Onions, Radishes, Lettuce, Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Carrots

Summer Plants:, [by this time the Radishes, Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower has been harvested]: About May 1-15 planting:  Tomatoes [4], Radishes [2nd planting], Cucumbers, Squash and Green Beans.  The secret to having this many plants in a small space is, buy the climbers.  You can grow upward, using less ground space.

Fall Plants:  Radishes [3 and 4 plantings, depending on how early the cold sets in], Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Onions[red or white]  Sugar Snap Peas.

To make it a success, planning is the first key in growing what you eat.  Dream it, plan it, plant it!

4 Methods of Easy Gardening

Our easy gardening methods as compared to the old fashion gardening the way your grandparents did it with a hoe, a shovel and a prayer. Old-fashioned gardening required lots of room, work and attention. Times have changed dramatically with today’s four methods for easy gardening.

  • Lasagna Gardening

In spite of it’s name, lasagna garden has nothing to do with an Italian dinner.  It is a method of easy gardening that turns your kitchen waste, leaves, grass clippings and old newspapers into rich, healthy compost without a lot of work. When the leaves start falling, gather them up and layer them over your Spring garden site. Add vegetable peelings, grass clippings, coffee grounds and a few inches of sawdust and/or newspapers. Cover the bed with cardboard, then a large piece of plastic and watch it as it shrinks down into compost.

The downside is this method of creating a rich compost right on your gardening spot, is it might take more than one season to convert your scraps into compost, which can be a negative point if you are in a hurry.  Adding a few Earthworms will speed up the process.

  • Square Foot Gardening

Easy gardening the Square Foot method, can make a great difference in your gardening activities because it does not require a lot of tools to toil the soil. Because you garden in one square foot at a time, you don’t have as many weed problems and the ground doesn’t get compacted easily. Careful soil mixtures will increase the water-holding abilities of the squares while decreasing the need for additional water. Plant diseases do not spread as easily in square foot gardens, either.

  • No Dig Method

 

4 Easy Gardening Methods

No-dig methods allows nature to carry out your cultivating operations. Placing different organic matters, such as well rotted manure, compost, leaf mold, spent mushroom compost, old straw, etc., directly onto the soil surface as a mulch at least 2–6 inches deep, which is then given to the actions of worms, insects and microbes. Another no-dig method is sheet mulching wherein a garden area is covered with wet newspaper or cardboard, compost and topped off with mulch. No-dig gardens can be grown over a lawn, on concrete or cardboard, if there is no need for a deep root system. The problem will be keeping the snails off your young vegetation.

  • Intensive Or Raised Bed Gardening

This method is a system of raised beds that allows you to concentrate the soil in small areas, generally 4 feet by 8 feet,  creating an environment for growing vegetables. Raised beds warm up more quickly in the spring and by covering them, it will allow you to grow vegetables for a longer time frame, early spring to late fall.

Easy Gardening Tip

Pests are usually fairly crop-specific. They prefer vegetables of one type or family. Mixing families of plants helps to break up large pest-preferred crops and keeps early pest damage within a small area.

As you can see, there are more methods of easy gardening than there is of the traditional hard way. If one of these appeals to you, find out more about it and then “dig in”.

Teaching Others To Vegetable Garden

Teaching others to grow their own vegetable garden can be life changing for all involved. You have heard the old saying about “To feed a man 1 day, give him a fish but to feed him a life time, teach him to fish”. I add to that, If you want to feed someone a healthy diet for a life time, teach them how to grow their own vegetable garden”.

For a better life and health, gardening is great habit to get into. There is no better gift than teaching family, especially children and friends how to grow their own food. Kids love getting in the dirt and playing around to begin with, so why not teach them to plant, cultivate and grow their favorite vegetables? Square foot vegetable gardening is a quick and easy way to start. Whether it’s a garden of fruits and vegetables that they get to eat, or just pretty flowers that they get to nurture and watch grow, it’s a great learning opportunity for all ages.

Tips For Teaching Others to Grow Their Vegetable Garden

Growing What You Eat in Your Own Vegetable Garden

Vegetable Garden

1. Find out the depth of their interest, the interest has to be there for gardening before you even start.

2. Make sure they have the right tools for the job. They will need hand tools, gloves, a hoe and rake for sure. Larger tools can be borrowed until they know for sure they will stick to gardening.

3. Choose vegetables that are easy to grow and they like to eat. You might not want something that’s going to take a long harvest time because they might lose interest if they do not see the fruits of their labor quickly. Here are a few you could try with your beginner gardener:

  • Tomatoes
  • Squash
  • Radishes
  • Beans
  • Sweet peas
  • Lettuce

So get out there and get to growing that vegetable garden. Remember to have fun, It’s not a chore, it’s a new life changing ability to learn. I have found that once a person gets into the enjoyment of gardening, they never get tired of it. There is always something new to do in the vegetable garden.

Three Ways To Get Big Yields From A Small Garden

Use Raised Beds Instead of Flat Garden Rows in Your Small Garden

Single rows of plants is the mainstay way of planting vegetables, but it is not the most efficient way. That’s because for every row, you must leave walking space between before the next row. That is a waste of a lot of space that could be used for growing crops. Planting raised beds or even beds on the flat soil will produce more and use less space. You can grow crops in several rows spaced closer together (as wide as you can reach) before stopping to leave a walkway.

Round off the Middle

Adding extra soil to the bed and rounding it off to form a small hill can add even more space to your planting area. Depending on the size of your “bed” it can give you 2 to 4 feet of extra planting area. Even in small beds that small difference can add pounds of more food to feed your family. My Grandpa Bird always planted his cucumbers, squash and potatoes in mounds of dirt. It allowed for more plants and let him harvest early new potatoes without destroying the whole plant, which was left to keep growing potatoes for the fall harvest.

Think Up

Once the ground around your feet is planted, it’s time to start growing up. Most often the space above your head is overlooked. Trellis and hanging baskets are two very simple ways to add growing space to your vegetables garden. A sunny wall or fence is a great place to place a vertical garden. Plant your peas, cucumbers, green beans at the base of a trellis and watch them grow.

This is a very handy tool for vertical gardening.  In the top openings, you can grow herbs, radishes, lettuce and other small veggies.  In the lower spaces, place some climbing bean and/or cucumbers.

Be on the look out for an old pallet, they make excellent planters for small items such as lettuce, herbs and onions. Just lean them against your fence or wall in a sunny spot. They are like magic for growing small vegetables such as radishes, chives, beets, or salad greens. Hanging baskets or growing bags [made of canvas, burlap or any sturdy material, that drains] can hold strawberries, dwarf varieties of cucumbers or green beans.

Don’t give up your dream of having a vegetable garden if all you have is a small garden space. Use your imagination and see what you can grow. Growing even 4 produce items and rotating them year around, can make a big difference in your family’s food budget. Plus think of all the salads that can come from your special small garden space. Your friends will be envious of you and your ingenuity.