Archive for organic food

Health Benefits of Growing Fresh Produce

Having good health benefits isn’t the only reason people choose to grow their own organic fruits and vegetables.  Saving money and having access to produce without chemicals are other good reasons. There also happen to be quite a few health benefits to choosing fresh produce, especially when you grow it yourself. Here are some health benefits to keep in mind.

Growing What You Eat in Your Own Vegetable Garden

It is Loaded With Nutrients

Fresh produce, including fruits, vegetables, and herbs, have tons of nutrients. Many of these are considered superfoods, which have a higher amount of vitamins and minerals. Some good superfoods are blueberries, kale, spinach, and strawberries. All fruits and veggies have a lot of nutrients you want for better health benefits, which are in higher amounts with fresh produce. Food items tend to loose its’ freshness and vitamins as it begins to age. This includes vitamins C and A, vitamin D, folate, potassium, fiber, and lots of it’s antioxidants.

You Can Prepare Well Balanced Meals

Thanks to the nutritious fresh produce and the convenience of having them at home, you can also use them to prepare healthier, more balanced meals. This is an excellent health benefit as your family might be struggling with malnutrition without even realizing it. Sure, you might be eating enough food, but not the right foods. Having fruits and vegetables right in your own backyard encourages you to prepare more of these balanced meals for the good of your family’s health.

Gardening Itself is Good Exercise

Even the growing of fresh produce in your backyard is going to be good for your health. It helps you burn calories, be more active, and can even get your kids involved. Plus don’t forget that when you are outside more often by planting your veggies and herbs, you are going to get more vitamin D from the sunlight. This helps to prevent vitamin D deficiency, which is common for many people, especially women. Try to get everyone in the family involved in growing your own food and you will all benefit from it.

You Won’t Have Nasty Chemicals

Growing your own produce means you have full control of what is added to it. You can avoid harsh fertilizers in the soil and use pest control methods that are completely natural without chemicals in them. This is the same thing you get from buying organic produce, but when you grow it on your own, you have the convenience factor and save money at the same time. Less chemicals is always a good thing when you start feeding your family more fruits and veggies. For better health benefits, organic is best. You can only be sure your food is organic, if you grow it yourself.

I’m Growing What I Eat

My little garden is starting to share it’s summer bounty.  This week I was able to add cucumbers, zucchini, banana peppers, potatoes, shallots and fresh Basil to my food pantry from my little garden.

Growing what I eat, enables me to control the pesticides and other things that normally are used in commercial foods.  I use none of the products that the large corporations use to control bugs and mold.  My main bug deterrent is a little dish soap mixed in a bottle of warm water.  I also use my fingers to remove anything larger than pea size.  Thankfully those are few and far between.

I'm growing what I eat

 

It looks like I am going to have an abundance of cucumbers, as I am picking 6-8 a day now.  One of the things that has helped my, growing what I eat garden, this season, was my use of a ground cover, to keep the dreaded white moth from laying it’s eggs in the soil around my seedlings.  When those eggs hatch, the larva eat the roots of your plants and your young plants die.  This light weight covering is one of my best helpers in my road to independence of growing what I eat.

winterize your garden

The tomatoes are beginning to appear, soon they will be ripe enough for me to use in my meals or as a snack.  I planted six Cherry Tomato plants and nine assorted verities of the larger tomatoes.  It wasn’t as many as last year but I still feel it’s enough for my large family to share and still have enough to can 12- 24 quarts for the winter.

I planned my evening meal around what I got from the garden in the morning.  I had already started the BBQ chicken legs in the slow cooker so I had a head start on the meal.  I added a couple of the new potatoes, a cucumber and a sliced tomato that one of my neighbors at the garden gave me.  A simple delicious meal that cost me very little time or money.

eating what I grow

 

From Your Yard To Your Table

Forget about the saying “Farm to Table” and think about, growing what you eat, using the “from your yard to your table” method, as a way to eat healthier and cheaper.  Ninety-five percent of us have space to grow some of our own food items.  It could be two to three vegetables or a well thought out 6 x 10 foot space for square foot beds and a few containers.  No matter which you decide to do, it can be the beginning of a great future in supplying yourself and family with the best organic food coming from your yard to your table.

from your yard to your table

Even using a small space if you rotate the plants during your nine or ten months of the growing time span, you can decrease your food budget and increase the quality of the food you put on your dinner table.  Like with most new things you might want to start small, then branch out with each growing season.

Choose your family’s favorite three or four vegetables and start with them. Research your best growing season for these items in your area, and choose the plants or seeds for that time period.  Some veggies can be planted more than one time within that growing time span.  The seed package is your best guide when choosing those seeds or plants.

www.Growingwhatyoueat.com

If you have small children, dogs or other small animals in your area and having your garden ground level would be more fight than pleasure, think about raising your growing boxes up higher.  This is my small raised bed where I place small plants that vine. It’s 24 inches wide by four feet long. At one end I grew midget cucumbers and planted the rest in hot peppers.  I placed the hot peppers up there because I didn’t want any little fingers finding the small red peppers too charming to resist and bite into one.

The old drawer below is where I started seeds to be planted in the beds, later in the season.  The get off to a good start and when the plants are 3-4 inches in height, I can move them into a bed when my earlier plants have been harvested.

If all you have is a patio, balcony, or small yard space, you can still think about growing what you eat, and bringing it from your yard to your table.

Tips For Sowing Small Seeds

Tips for Sowing Small Seeds

When sowing small seeds it’s sometimes hard to tell what area you have covered because the seeds are normally the same or close to being the same color as the earth.  In some cases you will not know you have over sown until the seedlings begin to appear and by then it’s to late to even them out.  Here are my favorite three ways to fix that problem before it happens.

All these tips suggest you mix the seeds with another ingredient to make them more visible.  Most you will already have on hand.

Sand:  If you use sand make sure it’s sea sand, as its’ edges have been rounded off by the constant movement of the ocean and will not harm your earthworms as play sand will do.  Play sand has rough edges which can cut the digestive system of the worms or even worse, kill them.  An organic garden without worms will not survive for a long period of time.

Flour:  Mixing the seeds with a little baking flour will also give you a better visible understanding of the location of your seeds.  Like the sand it has a few kinks.  You do not want to add too much flour or the damp soil will cause the flour to harden and trap the seeds, not allowing them to reach the dirt.  For every teaspoon of seeds, add one tablespoon of flour.  Shake or mix well then sow the seeds evenly in the dark soil. The result being even rows or spreading of the seeds, and not being over seeded.

Jello:  If you are planting very fine seeds, such as carrot, lettuce, or wildflower; mix the seeds with a package of colored gelatin powder. It really helps to spread the seeds evenly and makes it very easy to see where they’ve been sown. Plus the gelatin seems to help them grow too!

Keeping seeds where you can see them is beneficial  when sowing small seeds.  As with most things in life, learning to growing what you eat, takes time and a few good tips from your friends.  Here’s to Happy Gardening!

Grow Your Own Organic Food

The Best Way to Go Organic: Grow Your Own Organic Food

The cheapest and surest way to get good organic food is to grow your own, yourself. Growing your own organic food can be as simple as a few plants or as involved as you want it to get, by having a large outdoor garden.

If you are a first-time gardener, try not to overwhelm yourself. Think about container gardening or keep your garden relatively small, say a 4 ft x 12 ft raised bed. But think ahead and leave room for expansion when you are ready.

Containers work well for lots of vegetables but root vegetables may not be possible in some containers. Keep an open mind when looking for containers for your garden. Five gallon buckets, large bags [including the bags you buy your soil in] work great. Smaller food items like strawberries, cucumbers, carrots and herbs work well in smaller containers, such as a mop bucket, old pots that have seen their best days in the kitchen or clay flower pots. Cardboard boxes are another great help for growing in small places. Potatoes, tomatoes, green beans and peppers can all be grown in boxes.   cardboard boxes are great for growing organic food

When growing in the ground, there are two things to consider.

[1] Sunlight. You will want a spot that gets 6 to 8 hours of full sun, each day.

[2] Soil quality. You will need a pH balance of about 5.8 – 6.8. Inexpensive testing kit can be bought at a garden store or sometimes at a big box store.

You can correct acidity, by adding limestone. To decrease pH, or to correct alkalinity, use elemental limestone. Also, by adding leaves and plenty of other organic material you can enhance your soil to make it better and better each year.

If you can’t get your soil quite right, consider using raised beds around your yard. Then use bagged soil mixes that include animal manure for fertilizer to keep your vegetables organic. You can buy these products at most garden shops. If you are a first time vegetable gardener, consider planting some plant starts, instead of planting seeds. They may be a little more difficult to find organically, but for first time growers, they’re much easier to use. I have found smaller greenhouses can suit my needs for these plant starts.

Make sure to water your plants regularly. Seeds should be watered daily. New plants should be watered every 2-3 days. On particularly hot days, you may need to do more. You can even collect rain water for your plants by using rain barrels or creating your own from garbage pails.

One last tip, take the time to pull weeds. Make sure you grab the weeds fully by their roots or they will continue to grow. Weeding regularly will keep them from maturing and becoming problematic, especially, when you are just beginning to learn how to grow your own organic food.

For more information on growing your own organic food, read,  http://growingwhatyoueat.com/category/small-garden-spaces/