Archive for growing organic foods

Raised Beds Make Gardening Easier

Raised beds make gardening easier in many ways. They help you solve issues with your soil, aid in controlling pests, improve the amount of produce you can harvest in a small area.  They’re, also, great at reducing weeds and help conserve water.

Any plant that loves well-drained soil can benefit from being grown in raised beds. You don’t have to only grow vegetables. You can also easily grow herbs, fruits, and flowers in raised beds, thus making your job easier.

raised beds

In raised bed gardening, the soil is usually put into frames that are about three or four feet wide and 12 feet in length. The soil is generally enriched with compost, and is added to a frame made of wood or other material.

The plants in raised bed gardening are planted much closer together than the plants in a traditional garden. This allows the plants to conserve moisture and also help block the sun from allowing weeds to germinate and grow.

Raised beds can be used to extend the growing season, making it easier to start seeds outdoors earlier, and grow later in the season. This is a great way to get even more produce out of the area in a season.

If you have soil problems in your garden, you can use raised beds and just bypass your own soil completely. If you start with completely fresh soil, it doesn’t matter what type of soil you had in your garden to begin with.

Another great benefit of raised bed gardening is the fact that the gardener doesn’t walk on the soil in which the plants are growing. This helps prevent the soil from being packed down, so the roots can grow through the soil more readily.

You don’t need to till the soil under a raised bed if you don’t want to. This is very beneficial for people who can’t afford a tiller, or who aren’t physically capable of handling a piece of machinery like this.

You won’t have to water raised beds as often as you would a traditional garden. The soil in raised beds is designed specifically to hold on to water, so you can water less often and in smaller quantities. This is great for conserving water and saving money.

Frames can be built on top of plywood bases, and then raised to any height. This allows handicapped and elderly people to easily reach their plants to tend to them. For people in wheelchairs, this could be one of the only ways they can garden well.

Diseases and pests are easier to control in raised beds. Since you’re starting with fresh soil, it’s less likely to be contaminated with diseases that could infect your plants. If your plants do become infected, you can simple dispose of the soil in that bed and start again from scratch.

Pests are easier to control, because plants are in a more confined area. This makes it much easier to spot potential problems, and it also makes it easier to get rid of potential problems before they take over your entire garden.

6 Reasons To Grow What You Eat

Here are 6 top reasons to Grow What You Eat.

[1] You control the fertilizer and pesticides.

You do not have to wonder if your food is organic or not, as you have controlled everything that was in the soil or put on your plants as you grow what you eat.

grow what you eat
[2] Container or Raised Bed Gardening is easier than you first think.

Once you have your beds set up the right way, they take very little up keep as compared to traditional gardening.

[3] It’s fun to get your hands dirty and have something to show for it.

There are few things in life that give you the feelings you get when that first tomato ripens or you pull your first onion for the still cool soil of spring.
[4] Your food budget gets smaller while your smile gets brighter. Replace 4 store bought food items with 4 home grown items and easily save up to 15% on your grocery budget.

Just by replacing potatoes, tomatoes, onions, lettuce or other salad greens, fresh herbs and peas with your home grown ones, you can start saving for that new car.  None of the before mentioned vegetables or plants are hard to grow.  Once they are in the soil, they will grow with little help, except for watering a couple times a week.
[5] Better tasting recipes.

You will notice the change in the flavor of your food, with the first recipe using your fresh from the garden food items.  The potatoes will cook quicker because their moisture content hasn’t dried out in the 2000 mile journey they normally would have had to take to get from the garden to your table.  The salads will taste fresher and look much brighter in their color.  The tomatoes will taste sweeter and have more juice when cooking your red sauce.  The aroma of the herbs will fill your garden and give you ideas on what to make for your next meal.
[6] Your friends and neighbors will be green with envy over the fact that you know how to grow what you eat.  When you can grow what you eat, it brings a peaceful feeling into your life.  You have more control in other parts of your family life.  It gives you and those you love a common interest and sharing of ideas as you watch your plants grow, then finally sharing a meal that wouldn’t have happened if no one hadn’t dropped that first seed in the soil, on a cool day last spring.

There are many more reasons to learn how to grow what you eat, these are only a few of the more important ones.

A Kitchen Garden

One of the main virtues of a kitchen garden is accessibility. It should be easy to grab the items you need from it, to help you prepare your daily meals. Therefore, it should be located as close to your food preparation area as possible.

a kitchen garden_thegardenbuzz

Kitchen gardens are smaller than traditional gardens because they are position close to the house where space is usually limited. This isn’t always the case, of course, but having a culinary garden close enough to offer easy access while you are cooking may limit the amount of space available. Imagine you are preparing dinner when you realize you need a little Rosemary or Basil to make your recipe, just right. Being able to step just outside your kitchen door to get it, is far better than having to trek out to your large vegetable garden, while you have pots cooking on the stove. With a kitchen garden, the easier it is to grab what you need while you are cooking, the better.

A regular vegetable garden is about planning for the future, while a kitchen garden is about enjoying fresh items for your meals, today. The fruits and vegetables you plan to preserve for future use, such as corn, that take up a lot of space, are good choices for a traditional vegetable garden where space is at less of a premium.

Kitchen gardens are normally filled with the items you prepare and eat while fresh. Therefore, containers of fresh herbs, cherry tomato plants, or an assortment of leaf lettuces, all make great additions to a kitchen garden. If you lack the space for a larger traditional garden, a small kitchen garden, even done in containers, can keep you in fresh, delicious produce all season long.

Size and Beauty

 

While a standard vegetable garden is all about utility and production, part of the charm of a kitchen garden comes from its beauty aspect. Due to its closeness to the home, a kitchen garden is harder to tuck out of sight than a larger garden. You can often design them to add a sense of beauty to your home, as well.

In the past I have used beets, radishes, carrots, Basil and Rosemary to form a border around my patio. The greenery and fragrance add a delightful look and aroma to any home.

As you can see, a kitchen garden offers both convenience and beauty in a compact spaces. The best part being, it doesn’t take much to get one started. All you need is a couple of feet of dirt or a few large containers, some fresh herbs starts, a cherry tomato plant and a couple packs of seeds of your favorite radish and lettuce.

Removing Garden Pests In Your Organic Garden

Five Safe Ways to Remove Garden Pests in Your Organic Garden

When growing an organic garden, you want to take measures to also make sure you are safe. Trying to remove pests from the garden can lead to some less than safe actions. Keeping that in mind, here are five safe ways to remove garden pests from your home organic garden.

  •  Slugs: To rid yourself of these slime makers, sprinkle sawdust or wood chips around your garden to deter them. Slugs will not cross this rough barrier, so in time you will be slug free.
  • Grasshoppers: Spray grasshoppers with a mixture of molasses and milk. The sweetness attracts them, but it blocks their nasal passages and causes them to suffocate. Use 2 parts milk to one part molasses. You can easily get rid of an entire crop of grasshoppers by just spraying them with molasses and milk, whenever you see them.

Remove Pests From Your Organic Garden With Garlic

  • Garlic is not just for vampires: Planting garlic in your garden or just spraying it with garlic water, will stop many unwanted insects from visiting your garden. Plant the garlic through out your garden to keep certain pests at bay.
  •  Know Your Bugs: Know the helpful bugs from the destructive bugs. Keeping bugs like praying mantis, ladybugs, beetles, and spiders in your yard will be a huge help. They will eat all of those pests which do damage to your crops.
  •  Ducks and Chickens: If you live in an area that welcomes ducks and chickens, you can have a two for one, effect. Fresh eggs and bug free you will be. They will eat these destructive insects. Your family will love having these new pets as well. They do come with some responsibilities, as they can’t live on a diet of insects alone. They also like grains, seeds and just about all leafy greens. Guess I should have said, you will be getting a three for one, as they will eat, 90% of your fresh garden waste. Keep them protected in a coop at night so other animals wont prey on them.

When organic gardening, using these organic garden pest removal techniques will help grow a better garden. Teaming this pest control method with other ideas, such as building a healthy soil, using companion planting and crop rotation, you can help keep those unwanted critters at bay.

With organic gardening, there’s nothing more important than making sure you, your family and food source are safe. Avoiding toxic chemicals in your organic garden and using more natural methods for pest control is the only way to go.

 

 

Grow Your Own Organic Food

The Best Way to Go Organic: Grow Your Own Organic Food

The cheapest and surest way to get good organic food is to grow your own, yourself. Growing your own organic food can be as simple as a few plants or as involved as you want it to get, by having a large outdoor garden.

If you are a first-time gardener, try not to overwhelm yourself. Think about container gardening or keep your garden relatively small, say a 4 ft x 12 ft raised bed. But think ahead and leave room for expansion when you are ready.

Containers work well for lots of vegetables but root vegetables may not be possible in some containers. Keep an open mind when looking for containers for your garden. Five gallon buckets, large bags [including the bags you buy your soil in] work great. Smaller food items like strawberries, cucumbers, carrots and herbs work well in smaller containers, such as a mop bucket, old pots that have seen their best days in the kitchen or clay flower pots. Cardboard boxes are another great help for growing in small places. Potatoes, tomatoes, green beans and peppers can all be grown in boxes.   cardboard boxes are great for growing organic food

When growing in the ground, there are two things to consider.

[1] Sunlight. You will want a spot that gets 6 to 8 hours of full sun, each day.

[2] Soil quality. You will need a pH balance of about 5.8 – 6.8. Inexpensive testing kit can be bought at a garden store or sometimes at a big box store.

You can correct acidity, by adding limestone. To decrease pH, or to correct alkalinity, use elemental limestone. Also, by adding leaves and plenty of other organic material you can enhance your soil to make it better and better each year.

If you can’t get your soil quite right, consider using raised beds around your yard. Then use bagged soil mixes that include animal manure for fertilizer to keep your vegetables organic. You can buy these products at most garden shops. If you are a first time vegetable gardener, consider planting some plant starts, instead of planting seeds. They may be a little more difficult to find organically, but for first time growers, they’re much easier to use. I have found smaller greenhouses can suit my needs for these plant starts.

Make sure to water your plants regularly. Seeds should be watered daily. New plants should be watered every 2-3 days. On particularly hot days, you may need to do more. You can even collect rain water for your plants by using rain barrels or creating your own from garbage pails.

One last tip, take the time to pull weeds. Make sure you grab the weeds fully by their roots or they will continue to grow. Weeding regularly will keep them from maturing and becoming problematic, especially, when you are just beginning to learn how to grow your own organic food.

For more information on growing your own organic food, read,  http://growingwhatyoueat.com/category/small-garden-spaces/